Grevel Lindop

Poet, biographer, critic, essayist and writer on just about everything

Cold Beautiful Borrowdale

Spent a few days in Borrowdale last week and thought I’d upload a few photos: nothing exceptional, just the perpetually varying, incredible beauty of the area, which is never the same two days or indeed two hours together, no matter what the season. Some days the air was freezing but we had log fires!

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Styhead Gill coming down towards Seatoller

 

We didn’t do any long walks or high climbs because we had two-and-a-half-year-old Lyla with us, a determined walker in her pink wellies, and ten-year-old Sienna, a much more ambitious walker but at this time recovering from a bout of asthma. So we stayed in the valleys and walked slowly. Even so it was wonderful.

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South from Seathwaite towards Styhead

 

 

 

 

 

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Er… not sure of the location. Sty Head Gill again? Don’t know.

 

 

The only bit that wasn’t so good, though I suppose exciting, was getting caught is a blizzard on Dunmail Raise (which seems to have a special licence to put on blizzards when everywhere else is clear). The car ahead of ours stuck still, wheels spinning, and had to be pushed but my old Volvo struggled along and got a grip. Then we were over the Raise and heading down into Grasmere so all was well.

 

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Little Stanger Gill, swollen by rain

 

Borrowdale Magic

Borrowdale has been particularly beautiful the past couple of weeks, with the alternation of hot sun and occasional showers: the oak forests have looked lusher and greener than ever, and with the valley fields being reaped for hay and silage the air has been full of the fragrance of camomile and cut grass.

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Eagle Crag in mist: looking north from Stonethwaite

Amanda and I have just come back from Seatoller, enjoying our favourite walks to Castle Crag and Watendlath, and discovering some new delights: a highlight this time was following Langstrath Beck further than usual and finding the beautiful and rather hidden-away little waterfalls: something we’d missed before despite visiting Borrowdale over more than twenty years.

Here are a few pictures of places we’ve enjoyed recently.

 

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Stockley Bridge, Seathwaite

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Waterfalls in Langstrath Beck

 

Cumbria Blue Badge Guides: A Surprise at the Swinside Inn

I spent Monday and Tuesday this week up in the Lakes for a reason I couldn’t have guessed in a million years.

The Swinside Inn: traditional Newlands pub with great food

I’d had an email, totally unexpected, to say that the Cumbria Blue Badge Guides were celebrating the 20th anniversary of the founding of their Association in the Swinside Inn, at Newlands near Keswick, where the organisation was originally set up. They were going to have a plaque to commemorate the occasion and they wanted me to unveil it!

What's the collective noun for a set of Blue Badgers?

I found this pretty hard to believe because I don’t see myself as the sort of person who goes around unveiling plaques. But it wasn’t a hoax. It turned out that the Guides (and no, they’re not Girl Guides, they’re the accredited tourist guides who take people on all kinds of tours, big and small, around the towns, villages, historic sites and mountains of Cumbria) have been using my Literary Guide to the Lake District as a resource, year in and year out. So they’d decided to invite me to do the business.

A clean slate. Plenty of space for the next 20 years

I met the Guides and their friends and partners, led by Nicky Godfrey-Evans, at the Swinside Inn around 6 pm. After drinks and talk, and a photo session outside the Inn, we got the plaque unveiled. It’s a fine slab of Cumberland slate, engraved with the ‘Blue Badge’ design and details of the date and the Association it commemorates.

I quickly found that the Guides are a remarkable group of people, from all sorts of backgrounds. Their training is rigorous and they’re all enthusiasts for Cumbria (and other parts of the North-West) with their own special interests and expertise. They take on everything from demanding fell walks to coach tours and (as you’d expect in the Lakes) every one is a strong and genial personality. So the bar was buzzing with energy, ideas and laughter.

What you see when you wake up

The Swinside Inn is under new management and George and Judy treated us to a superb meal – absolutely first rate traditional Cumbrian food with a good range of choice. I stayed resolutely mainstream and I couldn’t have done better. The steak-and-ale pie was quite definitely the best I have ever tasted – tender, beautifully cooked and full of flavour; and the sticky toffee pudding (I had it with ice cream) was utterly delicious, and a satisfyingly huge helping as well.

I stayed overnight and was greeted with a fabulous view up the Newlands Valley towards Causey Pike in golden morning sunshine. Fabulous.

Seathwaite Farm, heading for Grains Gill

With the weather so good I wasn’t going to stay in the valley, so I went up to Seathwaite and walked up Grains Gill, then climed Scafell Pike. The air on the summit was icy but the rain and cloud held off and there was the whole of the Lake District, the Solway and the west coast with the Isle of Man on the horizon: everything misty green, gold and purple under a radiant blue sky.

Stockley Bridge, towards Seathwaite

If you’re walking in Newlands, do check out the Swinside Inn. And let’s hope for lots more fresh, sunny days like that as spring turns into summer.

It was a lesirely drive home, not least because some sheep were being moved from field to field at Lodore. They got

Looking back from Grains Gill

away from the dog and spilled all along the road, up side paths and into other people’s fields. One driver (not me) got out to stand and watch. Finally the shepherd came down with his dog. Unabashed, he took one look at the motorist and remarked, pointing at the other side of the road, ‘If ye’d’ve stood theer, ye’d’ve done sum gud.’ Quintessential Cumbrian remark!

Pedestrians made it a leisurely journey home