Grevel Lindop

Poet, biographer, critic, essayist and writer on just about everything

Strange Country Details

Bizarre signpost to Snipe House Farm (plus This, That and the Other Way!)

Exploring the countryside, I often notice and photograph quirky details – and then don’t know what to do with the pictures. So, unashamedly, this post will simply be a collection of strange or intriguinbg little things I’ve spotted here and there! Reflecting on this reminded me of my favourite book in the old ‘I-Spy’ series: I Spy the Unusual. It contained things like a thatched telephone kiosk… Not sure how many of those you’d find nowadays. Even in the 1950s you’d have got the full number of points for that one, I think.

Nothing quite so unusual here, but never mind. My prize for the oddest goes to this weird signpost on a path near Lamaload Reservoir. Quite amusing the first time you see it, but surely a very expensive joke for whoever put it up? That beautiful woodwork must have cost a fortune.

Next is a pair of Henry-Moore style natural sculptures on top of Kinder Scout. There are many more where these came from, but they look so companionable together!

Natural sculptures among the Tors on Kinder Scout

Then there’s this wonderful old threshing machine I found under the viaduct near Bosley in south Chesire. It must be a good hundred years old – it looks like the kind of thing Tess and her friend got so exhauster with feeding in Tess of the Durbervilles: a fascinating piece of industrial archaeology just rotting away in the nettles at the edge of a field.

 

 

Ancient threshing machine: just needs a traction engine to get it going!

Abandoned ship: by the causeway to Roa Island Cumbria

The next item isn’t really a country detail but I’m fond it and it puzzles me. It’s one of several derelict hulks left apparently to rot just off Roa Island near Barow in south Cumbria. Doesn’t it have any salvage value? Why has it been left here to disintegrate? A strange evocative sight of this weird, end-of-the-world place!

 

Then – back to the countryside – there’s an odd place in the Dane Valley where someone seems to have built a snall sheepfold (or something) around the trunk(s) of a three-trunked tree. I’ve never quite worked out what this is supposed to be for.

 

Stinkhorn: you may not haver seen one, but you’ve probably smelt it.

I can’t resist adding a photo of my favourite fungus: a stinkhorn. Very hard to find, though you can often smell them in woods from about August on. I tracked this one down following my nose, and it was a classic!

 

Root cutter at Crag Cottage, Eskdale

Finally, another indication of my love for old farm machinery. This, I think, is a root cutter: it sliced up turnips, swedes etc so that stock could eat them as winter feed. This one was rusting in a field just below Crag Cottage in Eskdale, former home of Hugh Falkjus, naturalistr and fisherman who used to entertain the poet Tom Rawling here for sea trout fishing holidays.

Tpom Rawling has a poem – ‘Rootcutter’ – which could even be about this very machine: it begins ‘Scrap iron among nettles, / A wheel, the drum it used to turn…’ and he remembers using one as a child on his uncle’s farm. Could this be the very one that suggested the poem much later, on a visit to Falkus? Maybe.

 

I may add other pictures in due course, but these are for a start!

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